Tag: god

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  • Amaunator

    Amaunator replaces Bahamut in the default D&D pantheon. While the silver dragon is his symbol, it in no way represents his appearance. Sophisticated theologians consider the question “What does Amaunator look like?” to be meaningless. The more naïve, if …

  • Pelor

    If [[Amaunator]] is the god of good, but from a distance (representing, for example, the Sun and Law), Pelor is the god of good close-up. He represents light, healing, and agriculture, and so is the god of choice for many peasants. His symbol is a lantern …

  • Erathis

    The god of civilization, of invention, of learning, and of society. Rulers, judges, pioneers, and citizens revere her, and her churches hold prominent places in the large towns of the world. Her symbol is a tower. Erathis is largely unchanged from the …

  • Avandra

    The god of change, Avandra delights in freedom, trade, adventure, and the frontier. Her temples are few in civilized lands (being mostly restricted to towns that engage in overland trade), but her wayside shrines appear throughout the settled world. [[ …

  • Jascar

    The god of creation, of hills and mountain, and of metalworking for use. Jascar replaces Moradin in the default D&D pantheon. He is often the third deity of dwarfs.

  • Kord

    Kord is the storm god, and the lord of battle and courage. He revels in strength, battlefield prowess, and thunder. Fighters and soldiers often choose him as their third god. He is a mercurial god, unbridled and wild, who summons storms over land; those …

  • Obadhai

    Obadhai is the god of nature, woodlands, hunting, and beasts. He is the most ancient known, being the primary god of the [[elf|elves]]’ native culture. He is often called the Shalm for the his bi-natured symbol, which is sometimes a staff and sometimes a …

  • Sehanine

    The god of magic as a creative and artistic force (compare this with [[Boccob]]), of metalworking for beauty, of autumn, of music, and of romantic love. Sehanine is worshipped by more [[eladrin]] than any other deity. Scouts and thieves ask for her …

  • Boccob

    The god of magic, knowledge, balance, and foresight. He is known as the Uncaring, the Lord of All Magic, and the Archmage of the Deities. Boccob replaces Ioun in the default D&D pantheon.

  • Istus

    Istus is the god of fate, prophecy, and the future. She is known as the Lady of Our Fate and the Colorless and All-Colored. She is rarely worshipped outright, instead being invoked by people looking to have good outcomes to future plans. Istus is …

  • Melora

    Melora is the god of the rivers, travel, and the sea; traditionally she is depicted as the wife of [[Kord]] (or, if one prefers, he is her husband). She is both the crashing wave and the peaceful harbour, the rapids and the pool. Sailors and fishermen …

  • Yutow

    The god of the moon, of death and re-birth, of night, and of trade. Yutow's symbol is a silver circle circumscribing an ellipse, representing the moon, a coin, and the eye of a nocturnal animal. Next to [[Obadhai]], he is the god most often worshipped …

  • Beltar

    The Dark Mother is the goddess of hate, greed, and strife. She is usually portrayed as a loathsome, twisted hag, but often takes on the form of a great red dragon. She is sometimes viewed as the opposite number of [[Amaunator]], the silver dragon. …

  • Erythnul

    Erythnul is the god of hate, envy, malice, panic, ugliness, and slaughter. He is known as the Many, and is particularly opposed to [[Erathis]] despite being her brother. Erythnul delights in panic and slaughter. His symbol is a staring eye. In …

  • Joramy

    Joramy is the god of restlessness, anger, endings, and of fire as a destructive force. She is the sole exception to the general rule that the evil gods are not openly worshipped. After a particularly bad year, a priest of another deity will be seconded to …

  • Nerull

    Nerull is the god of death and undeath, murder, and the underworld. He is known as the Reaper, the Foe of All Good, the Hater of Life, and the Bringer of Darkness. His symbol is a skull. He is usually depicted as a black-robed skeleton, with a rust-red …

  • Ralishaz

    Ralishaz is the god of random bad luck, conflict, and insanity. He is recognized, if not worshipped, in most civilized areas, and is often wordlessly invoked as a ward against ill-fortune. His symbol is three crossed sticks, and three extended fingers is …

  • Torog

    Torog is the evil god of the [[World Below]], of rot, famine, and pain. Common superstition holds that, if his name is spoken, the King that Crawls burrows up from below and drags the hapless speaker underground to an eternity of torment. It is also …

  • Zehir

    This god is the patron of darkness, poison, and assassination. Snakes, spiders, and scorpions are his symbol, and an alarmingly large number of [[tiefling]]s worship him in secret. Zehir is largely unchanged from the default D&D pantheon.